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Parker Lopez
Parker Lopez

Lavender


The commonly-cultivated lavender is the common or English lavender Lavandula angustifolia (formerly named L. officinalis) which is hardy to USDA Zone 5. A bushy perennial, lavender grows from 1 to 3 feet tall, bearing small blue-violet flowers on spikes with blue-green needle-like foliage. Its the oils in the flowers that give the herb its distinctive balsam-like fragrance.




Lavender


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Store lavender flowers in a lidded jar somewhere cool and dark, or pop them straight into a sachet to keep towels, sheets or clothes smelling sweet and to repel moths. If you suffer from insomnia, try inserting the sachets into a pillow so the calming scent can help you drift off to a restful slumber.


I like my lavender cookies a bit firmer and crispier. The original recipe says to let the dough sit on the counter for about 1/2 hour to allow the dough to rise. I would like to cut this time down to about 15 minutes or so. I think a bit of extra time allows the dough to rise faster and will create a firmer and more flavorful cookie.


This year I had an abundance of dried flowers from years of harvesting. The dried buds were removed from the stem and crushed to powder for an absolutely wonderful Lavender Shortbread cookie. The recipe is easy and has now become the family favorite. The taste of lavender isn't overwhelming, but just present enough to know you're eating something really special.


Kate Leino, can you please share your Lavender shortbread cookie recipe? Sounds amazing (love the smell of lavender, and shortbread cookies are my favorite). Where do you recommend I buy Lavender powder (we live in Hawaii, and we don't grow lavender). Thank you! Gloria


I live in the Andes, about 5000 feet. Two seasons: ho damp and humid. Typically little to no watering for almost six months. Then hot and dry for a comparable time period. Nearly every day something needs watering. My lavender, with grey leaves, is going into it's 3rd dry season. It is huge, at least 3 x 3.5 ft. It is in a long concrete planter, at one end with a large shrimp plant at the other end. In between are rosemary, a geranium and a sage. The planter was originally filled with mostly raw compost and cedar bark on top. It gets watered when dry and fertilized with compost tea rarely. All of these plans are so healthy and gorgeous, but only the shrimp plant and geranium bloom. Oh and variety of trandescancia - green and cream- that must be hacked brutally twice a year. What are your thoughts of lack of bloom to date for the lavender.


People usually associate lavender with two specific traits: its fragrance and its color. But you may not know that the lavender flower and the oil derived from it have long histories in herbal medicine.


Since ancient times, lavender has been used to reduce symptoms and provide support for multiple conditions. Modern science has confirmed many of its health benefits, while others are still under investigation.


Research from 2015 showed that people who used lavender aromatherapy felt more refreshed upon waking. Another 2010 study conducted on people with anxiety disorders revealed that orally administered lavender oil helped them sleep longer at night.


According to an older 1998 study of 86 people with alopecia areata, 44 percent experienced improved hair growth after massaging an essential oil blend of thyme, rosemary, lavender, and cedarwood in a mixture of carrier oils into their scalp daily for seven months.


Another small 2015 study looked at people with kidney disease. The researchers found that those who inhaled a lavender scent for 1 hour during hemodialysis had lower scores of depression and stress than those who did not.


Lavender spray, like a pillow spray at bedtime, is another effective means of using lavender as aromatherapy. If you have kiddos or enjoy crafts, tap into multiple senses by making a DIY lavender playdough.


Lavender oil is created by steeping lavender buds in a carrier oil, such as olive or coconut oil, typically for at least 1 week. In the finished product, lavender oil should account for just 0.5 percent to 2 percent of the total amount of oil, or 3 to 12 drops of essential oil per ounce of carrier oil.


To choose a high quality lavender oil, look for a product tightly sealed in a dark glass bottle with no additives or synthetic fragrances. And be sure to give it a sniff! A quality oil should have a strong smell.


For application on wounds or extremely dry skin, try a lavender salve. A salve is typically made with thicker oils, like coconut oil, or wax, like beeswax or soy. You can purchase them or make them yourself.


On the other hand, swallowing lavender essential oil is not a good idea. Essential oils can be toxic and lavender may cause intestinal cramping, nausea, or other adverse symptoms. Never consume lavender oil directly.


More research is needed to determine the safety of lavender in people who are pregnant or breastfeeding. If these conditions apply to you, talk with your doctor before beginning any treatment with lavender.


The different varieties of this plant range in height from 9 inches to 3 feet, although some may grow taller with age. Lavender are divided into four main categories: L. angustifolia, commonly known as English Lavender, is a frost hardy species that has many pretty cultivars, habit, and blossom color (formerly known as L. vera or L. officinalis); L. stoechas is a large plant with greenish-grey foliage and late blooming with a very strong odor (sometimes known as French lavender); L. latifolia, a Mediterranean grass-like lavender; and L. intermedia, which is a sterile cross between L. latifolia and L. angustifolia. The various lavenders have similar ethnobotanical properties and major chemical constituents [1].


Only few clinical investigations on lavender are available using diverse administration methods (i.e., oral, aromatherapy, and as a massage oil). The evidence for oral lavender is promising; however, until independent studies emerge with long-term follow-up data, it remains inconclusive [109]. The use of more widely used forms of lavender administrations (aromatherapy, inhalation, massage, etc.) is not currently supported by good evidence of efficacy. Future clinical trials, well-reported and adopting rigorous standard methodology, in combination with experimental pharmacological research, would help to clarify the therapeutic value of lavender for neurological and psychological disorders [109, 110].


Lavender has a large, spreading root system. However, do not plant lavender in shady spots in your garden where they will be overshadowed by trees or other large plants. Lavender grows best in full sun.


It's possible, but the only issue you'll probably have is not giving your plant enough light. Lavender loves warmth and you will need to give your lavender plant as much direct sunlight as you possibly can. Use a quick-drying clay pot with well-draining soil and plenty of drainage holes. It's best to plant a compact plant indoors, like French lavender.


A review article in the International Journal of Psychiatry in Clinical Practice evaluates how effective Silexan might be for patients with different anxiety disorders. Silexan is a lavender-oil preparation available in 80-milligram (mg) gelatine capsules.


The team found that those exposed to lavender scent reported lower levels of anxiety compared to the other patients. The calming effect of lavender was present regardless of the type of scheduled dental appointment.


This crossover study involved 17 women, aged on average 20.6 years, with mild-to-moderate premenstrual symptoms. The participants spent one menstrual cycle with no lavender aromatherapy treatment, and another undergoing lavender aromatherapy.


The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has not approved lavender for medicinal use. It is sold as a supplement only and should not replace any prescribed course of treatment.


A study published in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) revealed that repeated use of lavender oil on the skin might trigger prepubertal gynecomastia, a condition that causes enlarged breast tissue in boys before puberty.


Use dried lavender flowers for seasoning desserts, such as cookies, cakes, and ice cream, or as an edible garnish. Lavender blends deliciously with mint and lemon to brew a refreshing tea. Or try blending your own Herbes de Provence mix by combining dried lavender blooms with thyme, basil, fennel, and savory. Use this blend to season grilled meats and other savory dishes."}},"@type": "Question","name": "What's the best way to dry lavender?","acceptedAnswer": "@type": "Answer","text": "Cut stems just before they reach peak bloom, snipping them as long as possible. Remove the lower leaves along each stem, bundle 4-6 stems together with a string or rubber band, and hang upside down in a dark, well-ventilated area until dry. To dry just the lavender flowers, remove them from the stem and place them on a flat surface in a dark, dry location."]}]}] Skip to contentBetter Homes & Gardens - 100 years of powering your passions at homeSearchSearchPlease fill out this field.Log InMy AccountLog OutMagazine Subscribe Manage Your Subscription Give a Gift Subscription BHG Books BHG Archives Get Help Newsletter Sweepstakes Subscribe SearchSearchPlease fill out this field.DecoratingDecorating Rooms Choosing Color Window Treatments Interior Painting Decorating Tips & Advice Fireplace Design Ideas Seasonal Decorating Small-Space Decorating Styles & Decor Home Makeovers DIY Home Decor Traditional Home View All Home ImprovementHome Improvement Real Estate Home Exteriors Outdoor Structures DIY Home Electrical Tips & Guides Home Remodeling Porches & Outdoor Rooms Remodeling Advice & Planning Plumbing Installations & Repairs Flooring Decks View All GardenGarden Flowers Garden Pests Caring for Your Yard Container Gardens Garden Design Trees, Shrubs & Vines Houseplants Landscaping Edible Gardening Gardening By Region Plant Encyclopedia View All HousekeepingHousekeeping House Cleaning Laundry & Linens Cleaning Tips Organization Tips Closet Organization Kitchen Storage Organization Storage Solutions View All RecipesRecipes How to Cook Healthy Recipes Casseroles Chicken Recipes Desserts & Baking Slow Cooker Recipes Beef Recipes Breakfast and Brunch Recipes Global Recipes Quick & Easy Recipes View All ShoppingShopping Shop Our Collection BHG Recommends View All HolidaysHolidays St. Patrick's Day Easter Mother's Day Memorial Day Father's Day Juneteenth Traditions Entertaining View All NewsNews Home Trends Food Trends Gardening Trends About Us Subscribe Log InMy AccountMy AccountLog OutMagazineMagazine Subscribe Manage Your Subscription Give a Gift Subscription BHG Books BHG Archives Get Help Newsletter Sweepstakes Follow Us BHG's Facebook BHG's Instagram BHG's Twitter BHG's Pinterest BHG's YouTube BHG's TikTok BHG's Flipboard Decorating Rooms Choosing Color Window Treatments Interior Painting Decorating Tips & Advice Fireplace Design Ideas Seasonal Decorating Small-Space Decorating Styles & Decor Home Makeovers DIY Home Decor Traditional Home View All Home Improvement Real Estate Home Exteriors Outdoor Structures DIY Home Electrical Tips & Guides Home Remodeling Plumbing Installations & Repairs Flooring Decks View All Garden Flowers Garden Pests Caring for Your Yard Container Gardens Garden Design Trees, Shrubs & Vines Houseplants Landscaping Edible Gardening Gardening By Region Plant Encyclopedia View All Housekeeping House Cleaning Laundry & Linens Cleaning Tips Organization Tips Closet Organization Kitchen Storage Organization Storage Solutions View All Recipes How to Cook Healthy Recipes Casseroles Chicken Recipes Desserts & Baking Slow Cooker Recipes Beef Recipes Breakfast and Brunch Recipes Global Recipes Quick & Easy Recipes View All Shopping Shop Our Collection BHG Recommends View All Holidays St. Patrick's Day Easter Mother's Day Memorial Day Father's Day Juneteenth Traditions Entertaining View All News Home Trends Food Trends Gardening Trends About UsSubscribeGardeningEdible GardeningHerbsHow to Plant and Grow LavenderThis popular herb is most loved for its refreshing scent and long-lasting flowers that attract pollinators.By 041b061a72


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